Fire Safety Tips for College Students

Fire Safety Tips for College Students

Safety First: Fire Prevention Tips for On Campus Living

Living on campus is an exciting time for any college student. After all, what could be more fun than living in the same building as all of your friends?

But there are some hazards to this type of group living, particularly when it comes to fire risks. When a group of people is concentrated in one building, the risks of fire breaking out automatically increase. So, it’s worthwhile to learn about the best fire prevention tips for college students early to prevent a problem from coming up when it’s too late.

We’ve compiled a list of some basic fire safety tips for dorm room living and classrooms. Following these best practices as a group will help prevent fires and create a safer living environment for everyone.

Don’t Leave Candles Unattended

Candles can spell disaster if left unchecked and unattended. Sure, everyone loves the smell of a burning candle (especially in a smelly dorm room!), but there are ways to ensure the candle burns with less of a risk of catching something else on fire.

Don’t burn candles close to anything flammable. This includes curtains, cords, papers, books, or cans of hairspray or other flammable materials. Even if the candle is a small, single wick style, it can still pose a risk if the flame becomes tall or a breeze directs the flame to the side.

Additionally, take the time to trim the wicks of the candle after each use. Trimming the wick cuts down on the excess carbon build up, which can often lead to a higher flame and, therefore, a higher fire risk. By trimming the wick, you’re also extending the life of your candle — a win-win!

Be Wary of Cooking in a Dorm Room

Cooking at home can save money and time, but without a full kitchen this can often be more dangerous than helpful. Most dorm rooms do not allow for the use of hot plates or microwaves due to the fire and safety hazards.

When cooking in the dorm room, if this is a possibility, be sure to monitor all activity and not leave anything unattended. Cooking in a microwave is fairly safe, but be sure you are not putting anything such as aluminium foil or low-quality plastic in. These materials are not microwave-safe, meaning they can cause damage or not withstand the heat.

Don’t Overload Electrical Outlets

It can be tempting to plug in every electronic possible, but extra loose cords can be a fire risk. Use surge protectors when you need to utilize the space for multiple cords, and monitor the quality of the cords to ensure there is no fraying or damage to the wires.

In addition, be sure to keep the dorm room tidy and free of clutter. Clutter, in a bad situation, can be more kindling than anything else. This goes for cords — keep them organized and away from things such as candles or hot plates. The neater the dorm room, the less of a risk there will be for fire hazards.

Communal living provides plenty of challenges for safety, but simply living responsibly and monitoring any hazards can go a long way to prevent a disaster from happening.

Source: Firefighters Fund